PCC 0 votes

The Portable C Compiler (also known as pcc or sometimes pccm - portable C compiler machine) is an early compiler for the C programming language written by Stephen C. Johnson of Bell Labs in the mid-1970s, based in part on ideas from Alan Snyder in 1973.
The keys to the success of pcc were its portability and improved diagnostic capabilities:

1.The compiler was designed so that only a few of its source files were machine-dependent.
2.It was relatively robust to syntax errors and performed more thorough validity checks.

Mono 0 votes

Mono is a software platform designed to allow developers to easily create cross platform applications. Sponsored by Xamarin, Mono is an open source implementation of Microsoft's .NET Framework based on the ECMA standards for C# and the Common Language Runtime. A growing family of solutions and an active and enthusiastic contributing community is helping position Mono to become the leading choice for development of Linux applications.

Git 0 votes

Fast Version Control System

Git is a free & open source, distributed version control system designed to handle everything from small to very large projects with speed and efficiency.

Every Git clone is a full-fledged repository with complete history and full revision tracking capabilities, not dependent on network access or a central server. Branching and merging are fast and easy to do.

JSMin 0 votes

The JavaScript Minifier

JSMin is a filter which removes comments and unnecessary whitespace from JavaScript files. It typically reduces filesize by half, resulting in faster downloads. It also encourages a more expressive programming style because it eliminates the download cost of clean, literate self-documentation.

Script# 0 votes

C# Developer Goodness, JavaScript Deployment Bliss!

Script# is a development tool that generates JavaScript by compiling C# source code. It is especially interesting for scripting-in-the-large scenarios that is commonplace in the current generation of HTML5 and script-based Web applications.

Script# lets you leverage the productivity of C# (intellisense, build-time error checking, natural language syntax), and the power Visual Studio IDE and standard .NET tools (such as msbuild, refactoring, unit testing, static analysis, code visualization, fxcop). Script# brings all this to you without abstracting the runtime environment - you're still authoring script, just with a different set of tools.

You can even use Script# to work against other existing frameworks and APIs such as jQuery, jQuery plugins and Knockout, and can be extended to work against other existing script.