Jikes 0 votes

Jikes is a compiler that translates Java source files as defined in The Java Language Specification into the bytecoded instruction set and binary format defined in The Java Virtual Machine Specification.

Harbour 0 votes

Harbour is a modern computer programming language. It is a Clipper-compatible compiler which is cross-platform, running on many operating systems (DOS, Microsoft Windows, Linux, Unix variants, several BSD descendants, Mac OS X, MINIX 3, Windows CE, Pocket PC, Symbian, iPhone, QNX, VxWorks, OS/2/eComStation, BeOS/Haiku) using the same source code and databases.

Although it is a powerful general-purpose programming language, it was primarily used to create database/business programs. Harbour have been actively maintained looking for diversity keeping backward-compatible with Clipper style. It has undergone many changes and revisions and regain widely popularity amongst programmers in 1980s and 1990s.

The open source Harbour license[1] is similar to the GNU General Public License, with an exception supporting proprietary applications, so proprietary applications can be produced with Harbour and distributed.

GNU Compiler Collection(GCC) 0 votes

The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) is a compiler system produced by the GNU Project supporting various programming languages. GCC is a key component of the GNU toolchain. As well as being the official compiler of the unfinished GNU operating system, GCC has been adopted as the standard compiler by most other modern Unix-like computer operating systems, including Linux, the BSD family and Mac OS X. There is also an old (3.0) port of GCC to Plan9, running under its Ansi Posix Environment (APE).
GCC has been ported to a wide variety of processor architectures, and is widely deployed as a tool in commercial, proprietary and closed source software development environments. GCC is also available for most embedded platforms, for example Symbian (called gcce), AMCC and Freescale Power Architecture-based chips. The compiler can target a wide variety of platforms, including videogame consoles such as the PlayStation 2 and Dreamcast. Several companies make a business out of supplying and supporting GCC ports to various platforms, and chip manufacturers today consider a GCC port almost essential to the success of an architecture.
Originally named the GNU C Compiler, because it only handled the C programming language, GCC 1.0 was released in 1987, and the compiler was extended to compile C++ in December of that year. Front ends were later developed for Fortran, Pascal, Objective-C, Java, and Ada, among others.

Traceur Compiler 0 votes

Google's vehicle for Javascript Language Design Experimentation

Traceur is a JavaScript.next-to-JavaScript-of-today compiler that allows you to use features from the future today. Traceur's goal is to inform the design of new JavaScript features which are only valuable if they allow you to write better code. Traceur allows you to try out new and proposed language features today, helping you say what you mean in your code while informing the standards process.

JSIL 0 votes

.NET to JavaScript compiler

JSIL is a compiler that transforms .NET applications and libraries from their native executable format - CIL bytecode - into standards-compliant, cross-browser JavaScript. You can take this JavaScript and run it in a web browser or any other modern JavaScript runtime. Unlike other cross-compiler tools targeting JavaScript, JSIL produces readable, easy-to-debug JavaScript that resembles the code a developer might write by hand, while still maintaining the behavior and structure of the original .NET code. Because JSIL transforms bytecode, it can support most .NET-based languages - C# to JavaScript and VB.NET to JavaScript work right out of the box.