Redcar 1 vote

Redcar is a programmer's text editor for GNOME, written in Ruby and Vala (a curious C# like language for use with GNOME), by Daniel B Lucraft.
Redcar probably isn't going to be your next editor, at least not yet. It's still in its early stages with version 0.1 only being released a week ago and you have to get it running from source (no binary distributions yet). Despite all of this, it already boasts compatibly with Textmate highlighting, snippets, and quite a lot of Textmate bundle commands. It's GPL2 licensed, too. The code is available in a Github repository.

Despite the focus on GNOME, it should be possible to get Redcar running on both Windows and Mac OS X as well as Linux, but I've personally found the dependencies for Ruby-GNOME2 to be an absolute beast to install on OS X.

Bluefish 0 votes

Bluefish is a powerful editor targeted towards programmers and webdesigners, with many options to write websites, scripts and programming code. Bluefish supports many programming and markup languages, and it focuses on editing dynamic and interactive websites.Bluefish is an open source development project, released under the GNU GPL licence.Bluefish runs on most (maybe all?) POSIX compatible operating systems including Linux, FreeBSD, MacOS-X, OpenBSD and Solaris, and in addition it runs on Windows.

Emacs 0 votes

GNU Emacs is an extensible, customizable text editor—and more. At its core is an interpreter for Emacs Lisp, a dialect of the Lisp programming language with extensions to support text editing. The features of GNU Emacs include:

1.Content-sensitive editing modes, including syntax coloring, for a variety of file types including plain text, source code, and HTML.
2.Complete built-in documentation, including a tutorial for new users.
3.Full Unicode support for nearly all human languages and their scripts.
4.Highly customizable, using Emacs Lisp code or a graphical interface.
5.A large number of extensions that add other functionality, including a project planner, mail and news reader, debugger interface, calendar, and more. Many of these extensions are distributed with GNU Emacs; others are available separately.

Emerald Editor 0 votes

Emerald Editor is a text editor, that is under development, that has been substantially influenced by Crimson Editor. Available under the GNU General Public License, it will be an open-source, multi-purpose, functional text editor.

geany 0 votes

Geany is a text editor using the GTK2 toolkit with basic features of an integrated development environment. It was developed to provide a small and fast IDE, which has only a few dependencies from other packages. It supports many filetypes and has some nice features.

SciTE 0 votes

SciTE or SCIntilla based Text Editor is a cross-platform text editor written by Neil Hodgson using the Scintilla editing component. It is licensed under a minimal version of the Historical Permission Notice and Disclaimer.[1] The current version is 2.29, released on 16 September 2011.
Lightweight and built for speed, it is designed mainly for source editing, and performs syntax highlighting and inline function reference for many different languages. There is a standalone .exe available also, ideal for USB flash drives including U3-compatible models. SciTE shares some features with other editors that are also based on the Scintilla editing component.

Kate 0 votes

In computing, Kate is a text editor by KDE. The name Kate is an acronym for KDE Advanced Text Editor.
Kate is a full-featured programmer's editor with syntax highlighting for over 150 filetypes. The syntax highlighting is extendable via XML files and can also specify code folding rules. It has support for search and replace using regular expressions and supports auto-detection of file encodings. Supported encodings include UTF-8, UTF-16, ISO-8859-1 and ASCII.

Kate can be used as a modal text editor by using its vi input mode which emulates the vi editor.

By using sessions, one can customize Kate for different projects. When using sessions, the list of open files, the list of enabled plug-ins and the window configuration are saved, allowing Kate to be customized for a given project.

Vim 1 vote

Vim is a highly configurable text editor built to enable efficient text editing. It is an improved version of the vi editor distributed with most UNIX systems.

Vim is often called a “programmer's editor,” and so useful for programming that many consider it an entire IDE. It's not just for programmers, though. Vim is perfect for all kinds of text editing, from composing email to editing configuration files.
Vim can be configured to work in a very simple (Notepad-like) way, called evim or Easy Vim.