CSSTidy 0 votes

CSSTidy is an opensource CSS parser and optimiser. It is available as executeable file (available for Windows, Linux and OSX) which can be controlled per command line and as PHP script (both with almost the same functionality).
In opposite to most other CSS parsers, no regular expressions are used and thus CSSTidy has full CSS2 support and a higher reliability.

Features (“a” stands for all selectors, “margin” stands for all properties):

  • colours like “black” or rgb(0,0,0) are converted to #000000 or rather #000 if possible. Some hex-codes are replaced by their colour names if they are shorter.
  • a{property:x;property:y;} becomes a{property:y;} (all duplicate properties are merged)
  • margin:1px 1px 1px 1px; becomes margin:1px;
  • margin:0px; becomes margin:0;
  • a{margin-top:10px; margin-bottom:10px; margin-left:10px; margin-right:10px;} becomes a{margin:10px;}
  • margin:010.0px; becomes margin:10px;
  • all unnecessary whitespace is removed, depending on the compression-level
  • all background-properties are merged
  • all comments are removed
  • the last semicolon in every block can be removed
  • missing semicolons are added, incorrect newlines in strings are fixed, missing units are added, bad colors (and color names) are fixed

less 0 votes

The dynamic stylesheet language.

LESS extends CSS with dynamic behavior such as variables, mixins, operations and functions. LESS runs on both the client-side (IE 6+, Webkit, Firefox) and server-side, with Node.js.

Stylus 0 votes

Expressive, dynamic, robust CSS

Robust, expressive, and feature-rich CSS superset.

Stylus is a revolutionary new language, providing an efficient, dynamic, and expressive way to generate CSS. Supporting both an indented syntax and regular CSS style.

Sass 0 votes

Style with Attitude

Sass makes CSS fun again. Sass is an extension of CSS3, adding nested rules, variables, mixins, selector inheritance, and more. It’s translated to well-formatted, standard CSS using the command line tool or a web-framework plugin.

Sass has two syntaxes. The new main syntax (as of Sass 3) is known as “SCSS” (for “Sassy CSS”), and is a superset of CSS3’s syntax. This means that every valid CSS3 stylesheet is valid SCSS as well. SCSS files use the extension .scss.

The second, older syntax is known as the indented syntax (or just “Sass”). Inspired by Haml’s terseness, it’s intended for people who prefer conciseness over similarity to CSS. Instead of brackets and semicolons, it uses the indentation of lines to specify blocks. Although no longer the primary syntax, the indented syntax will continue to be supported. Files in the indented syntax use the extension .sass.